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Professor Lars Vabbersgaard Andersen is heading the Danish part of the project, which goes by the name Reconcile. Photo: Ida Jensen, AU Foto.

2020.10.06 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Nordic research collaboration to examine energy consumption in public buildings

In a new project, Sweden, Norway and Denmark will gather and exchange experience from building projects in order to optimise energy consumption in public buildings.

A new test bench will make it possible to measure the impact of forces on the giant wind turbines of the future and simulate their wear and lifecycle. (Photo: Colourbox).
The Danish company, R&D Test Systems, is behind one of today's largest and most advanced test benches for wind turbines. The test bench weighs 4,000 tonnes, has a 1,500 m2 concrete foundation, and contains 200 tonnes of reinforced steel. It is currently at the Lindø Offshore Renewables Center (LORC). (Photo: R&D Test Systems)

2020.08.12 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Danish engineers to build the world's largest test bench for wind turbines

A huge test bench for nacelles will make it possible to build even bigger wind turbines in the future.

The final project aims at creating a balloon of 330 x 330 metres buried under a maximum of 25 metres of soil that will be raised by up to 14 metres when the balloon is filled up. This will store 230 MWh. Photo: AU Foto.

2020.07.19 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Aarhus University to build a test facility for technology that can store wind energy in ‘water balloons’

With a grant of almost DKK 5 million from the Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Programme, EUDP, under Danish Energy Agency, work is about to begin on building a 100 sqm test facility to demonstrate new technology that stores green surplus energy in giant underground water balloons.

"The building management team have the greatest influence on efficiency, and thereby on how much money is earned. And the way you increase efficiency is by using the methods, tools and knowledge that already exist," says Hasse Neve (right) who, together with Professor Søren Wandahl (left) and others, is behind the new research that shows how to change productivity development in the construction industry. Photo: Anders Trærup

2020.07.10 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Construction: How to turn 36 seconds into USD 5.4 billion

A team of researchers from Aarhus University have, for the first time ever, linked 40 years of productivity data from the construction industry with the actual work done. The results show that productivity in the construction industry has been declining since the 1970s. The results also explain the decline and how to achieve far more efficient…

EU's industry accounts for 20% of the overall emissions of the region and there is an urgent need for engineers to create more sustainable technologies and solutions. Photo: Colourbox

2020.04.30 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Focus on integrating sustainability into AU's engineering programmes

Sustainability is much more complex than you might think, and therefore teaching the topic is very important, says an AU researcher from the Department of Engineering.

Drifting: A driving technique originating from Japan, where the driver intentionally oversteers, thereby loosing traction while maintaining control and driving the car through the entirety of the corner. The book applies this analogy to the conception of Constructive Design Research. Photo: Colourbox.

2020.04.01 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Drifting by Intention: New book on design research

Design and engineering are often seen as solution-oriented disciplines. So how do you design not only to solve a challenge, but also to build knowledge? This is the focus of a new book written by the architect, Professor Peter Gall Krogh. The book has just been published by Springer Nature.

During the past few years Aliakbar Kamari has developed a digital BIM based sustainability tool called PARADIS, which will be released as freeware later in the year. Photo: Melissay Yildirim, AU Foto.

2020.03.23 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

‘Paradise’ and modern construction

Aliakbar Kamari is a new tenure track assistant professor at the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University. With PhD degrees in both architecture and engineering, and with his newly developed BIM-based tool, Aliakbar Kamari will be an important figure in the university's research group for tectonic design.

"Denmark is currently one of the best places to conduct research on timber structures, because so much is going on right here, right now. This is where we can help make a difference in the buildings and construction sector, which is currently responsible for more than a third of the global CO2 emissions," says Assistant Professor Markus Hudert. Photo: Melissa Yildirim, AU Foto. .

2020.02.21 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

New researcher to investigate novel ways of building with timber

Markus Hudert is a new assistant professor at the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University. With his background in architecture and research into timber structures, he will introduce new knowledge to the area of tectonic design, an important area of research at the university.

Elisabeth Granzow Larsen (left) and Christina Poulsen (right) in front of their campus, Navitas, at Aarhus Ø. Photo: Melissa Yildirum, AU Foto.

2020.01.17 | AU Engineering, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Study: Urban noise does not seem as loud when we look at nature

Two MSc Eng students from Aarhus University have set out to examine the correlation between what people see and what they hear. Using VR technology, they have discovered that looking at nature seems to dampen our hearing.

"The idea is to use friction and compression to create spatial structures with no mortar. Simply blocks that are held together by the laws of physics," says Assistant Professor Valentina Beatini. Photo: Lars Kruse / AU Foto.

2019.11.09 | Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Creating anticlastic architecture using Newton’s laws

Valentina Beatini, architect from the University of Genoa and PhD from the University of Parma, is a new assistant professor at the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. Her research is focused on building strange shape constructions using high friction masonry.

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